The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D: Including a Journal of His Tour to the Hebrides - Vol. 2

The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D: Including a Journal of His Tour to the Hebrides - Vol. 2

Read FREE!

The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D: Including a Journal of His Tour to the Hebrides - Vol. 2

The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D: Including a Journal of His Tour to the Hebrides - Vol. 2

Read FREE!

Excerpt

"Making Fools of one's Visiters " -- Trade -- Mrs. Williams's Tea-table -- James Ferguson --lb /> Medicated Baths -- "Coddling" Children -- Population of Russia-Large Farms -- Attachment to soil -- Roman Catholic Religion -- Conversion to Popery -- Fear of Death -- Steevens -- "Tom Tyers" -- Blackmore's "Creation" -- The Marriage Service -- "The False Alarm" -- Percival Stockdale -- Self-examination -- Visit to Lichfield -- and Ashbourne -- Baretti's Travelt -- Letters to Mrs. Thrale -- Warton, &c.

ON the 26th of October, we dined together at the Mitre tavern. I found fault with Foote for indulging his talents of ridicule at the expense of his visiters, which I colloquially termed making fools of his company. JOHNSON. "Why, Sir, when you go to see Foote, you do not go to see a saint: you will go to see a man who will be entertained at your house, and then bring you on a public stage; who will entertain you at his house, for the very purpose of bringing you on a public stage. Sir, he does not make fools of his company; they whom he exposes are fools already: he only brings them into action.

Talking of trade, he observed, "It is a mistaken notion that a vast deal of money is brought into a nation by trade. It is not so. Commodities come from commodities; but trade produces no capital accession of wealth. However, though there should be little profit in money, there is a considerable profit in pleasure, as it gives to one nation the productions of another; as we have wines and fruits, and many other foreign articles, brought to us." BOSWELL "Yes, Sir, and there is a profit in pleasure, by its furnishing occupation to such numbers of mankind." JOHNSON. "Why, Sir, you cannot call that pleasure, to which all are averse, and which none begin but with the hope of leaving off; a thing which men dislike before they have tried it, and when they have tried it." BOSWSLL. "But, Sir, the mind must be employed, and we grow weary when idle." JOHNSON. "That is, Sir, because others being busy, we want . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.