Influence of the Great War upon Shipping

Influence of the Great War upon Shipping

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Influence of the Great War upon Shipping

Influence of the Great War upon Shipping

Read FREE!

Excerpt

This monograph on shipping, by Professor J. Russel Smith, Of the University of Pennsylvania, is one of the series of preliminary war studies undertaken by the Endowment, the first of which was published in January, 1918. Few matters connected with the war have attracted the attention of the public of the country, and, indeed, of the world, in recent month so much as the question of the shipping supply. The dastardly policy of the Imperial German Government in sinking all ships, without reference to their character or their mission, has proved so serious a menace that for a time some alarm was felt as to the ability of the United States and her allies to find sufficient means of transportation for men and goods. When the question became a pressing one for us we turned naturally to the experience of our English brethren. But our problem was somewhat different from theirs , for the reason that we did not have the experience and facilities on so large a scale as had Great Britain. Moreover, it seems as if nations, like individuals, refuse to benefit by the experience of others. The British Government, in its attempts to stimulate and regulate ship production, and to control shipping in the general interest, made many blunders which we might have learned from her experience to avoid. For, in spite of the fact that Britain is a shipping nation, we find in the early government attempts to control shipping some such ignorance, some such blundering and some such inefficiency as have marked our own conduct in the matter.

Professor Smith describes and explains the causes of our blundering and inefficiency so fully that it is not necessary to say much about them here. It seems clear, however, to a disinterested observer that there has been little in our experience during the past year in connection with shipping to justify us in thinking that governments are more efficient than they ever were . . .

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