The New Harmony Movement

The New Harmony Movement

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The New Harmony Movement

The New Harmony Movement

Read FREE!

Excerpt

What is called in this book the "New Harmony Movement" forms a noteworthy practical lesson in sociology-- in that part of sociology which treats of the ISMS of that important science.

In the institutions of civilization we count four cardinal types--the family, civil society with its division of labor, the state, the church. The two extremes--the family and the church--give us, on the one hand, the first departure from the individual with his narrow experience, and on the other the arrival at the highest reenforcement by the race or the social whole. The family, although nearest to the unassisted individual, does not for that very reason permit much development of individuality. Its principle is obedience to elders, and especially to parents and naturally constituted guides. A high degree of self- activity and independence is not found possible in this institution, because blind obedience is irrational.

As compared with the family, civil society with its division of labor gives greater opportunity for the development of individuality. The individual through his vocation contributes something to supply the wants of his community. He makes some article or performs some function that is useful to the social whole, and thereby lays his community under obligation to him and gets recognition for his service. He has proved himself essential to the society in which he lives, and society hastens to set before him, for the supply of his own particular needs, the aggregate production of all the units of society. It . . .

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