Ideas of Europe since 1914: The Legacy of the First World War

Ideas of Europe since 1914: The Legacy of the First World War

Ideas of Europe since 1914: The Legacy of the First World War

Ideas of Europe since 1914: The Legacy of the First World War

Synopsis

This book is about the history of Europe in the 20th century and concentrates on two particular aspects. First, it examines the impact of the Great War on Europe; secondly it is concerned with European civilization and with ideas of what is meant to be "European". The approach is interdisciplinary, including integrated analyses from politics, international relations, political ideas, literature, and the visual arts. The common focus, which links all the chapters, is the effect of the Great War on a European mentality, or European identity.

Excerpt

This book is one of the outcomes of an international research project which began in 1997. Michael Wintle of Hull University and Peter Bugge of Aarhus University had for some time been discussing a joint undertaking to examine the experience of Europe in the twentieth century in the light of the impact of the First World War, using the concept of European identity as a central analytical tool. They were subsequently joined by colleagues from Hull and Aarhus Universities, and by Menno Spiering and others from Amsterdam University. This international group met on various occasions and began to evolve a set of research questions and a plan for a series of studies on the topic. An application was made to the British Academy's International Research Collaboration Scheme in 1998, and a generous grant in two tranches supported the project with travel and other costs, principally for a symposium which was held near the University of Hull at Burton Agnes Hall in East Yorkshire in April 2000. Some of the papers delivered there formed the first drafts of some of the chapters of this volume; all were thoroughly rewritten in the light of our deliberations, and several more were commissioned for the version published here. We are very grateful to the British Academy for its award, which made the project possible, and to the Hon. Mrs S. Cunliffe Lister of Burton Agnes Hall for permission to use part of the Hall premises for the symposium. Subsequently the Universities of Amsterdam and Hull contributed funds for some translation and other costs, for which our thanks are also due.

Dr Peter Bugge has played a central role in this project from the start; only the heavy burden of other commitments obliged him to stand down, modestly as ever, from joint-editing this volume. We would also like to thank all the contributors both to the book and to the research programme for their patience, perseverance and collegiality.

Menno spiering michael wintle

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.