Red Storm over Asia

Red Storm over Asia

Red Storm over Asia

Red Storm over Asia

Excerpt

This book is concerned with the Communist march across Asia, chiefly during the years 1948-1950. I have not dwelt wholly on the subject of the Communists, for it seemed necessary to place Communism in its proper setting and to discuss those countries, like Indonesia, where Communism has failed or is in abeyance, and to discover the reasons for its failure, just as elsewhere it has seemed necessary to discuss the reasons for its success. During those three years, the most significant events in Asia were the Communist conquest of China, the extension of the influence of the government of the Indonesian Republic over the majority of the islands of the Indies, and the war in Korea: in all these events Communism played a major part, and so they are studied here at some length. In the other Asiatic countries I have contented myself with a discussion of the background, and I have tried to measure the degree and kind of Communist penetration. Inevitably, there is little here about the quarrel between Pakistan and Kashmir and India, and nothing at all about Thailand, because neither the quarrel nor the nation appears to play any major part in the development of modern Asiatic history.

Anyone looking at the map of Asia where the Communist-occupied territories are marked in red sees a vast red thundercloud from which a few drops of scalding rain are descending. There are drops in India and Pakistan, in Iran, in Burma and Malaya; there are large splashes in the Philippines and in Indochina. A thundercloud cannot be contained. It must pass on or be broken up, or it must change into some other kind of cloud altogether. The very shape of the thundercloud is something that should be studied carefully. What is clear is that unless radical measures are taken, the raindrops will become a flood.

The thundercloud has been gathering for a long time, and before it is finally dissipated, if it is ever dissipated, we can expect more raindrops to fall. But we should know why it has come about and . . .

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