Foreign Policies of the Founding Fathers

Foreign Policies of the Founding Fathers

Foreign Policies of the Founding Fathers

Foreign Policies of the Founding Fathers

Excerpt

Every generation writes its own history. The period 1774-1812 takes on new meaning to those who study it from the vantage point of post World WarII. The new nation confronted much the same problems as those which bedevil nations emancipated from colonial domination since World War II. For example, there were the same pressing needs for capital, and the same unhappy situation of a country engaged largely in producing raw materials to be consumed by other more advanced nations. And in a new nation where the government had not yet firmly established itself, just as in the new nations of today, domestic political questions were of such pressing importance, if for no other reason than that the leaders were conscious of establishing precedents, that domestic affairs had a greater than customary influence on the shaping of foreign policy. For these reasons alone the foreign policies of the founding fathers are of especial interest today.

But it is not only a matter of rewriting the history of the early national period from the vantage point of the mid-twentieth- century. Man's concepts of historical studies also change as new experiences give rise to new questions. Since the days of Leo . . .

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