Structure and the Social Studies

Structure and the Social Studies

Structure and the Social Studies

Structure and the Social Studies

Excerpt

This volume had its beginnings in a series of workshops held at Cornell University to study the curriculum revision movement in elementary and secondary school social studies. About fifty teachers of history, geography, and the social sciences from central New York State participated, representing all levels of instruction from kindergarten through graduate school. The workshops were financially supported by two teacher education projects at Cornell, which in turn were assisted by the Ford Foundation, the University, and some twenty school districts in the Ithaca area.

At the heart of the project, and of this book, was the concept of structure. The idea will be analyzed in considerable detail in Chapter 2, but the reader should be aware at the outset that the study began with a tentative position that any discipline worthy of inclusion in the curriculum must have some basic and developmental ideas -- both substantive and methodological -- to form the core of what is taught in elementary and secondary schools and that the first job of a curriculum builder should be to identify the structural content of the curriculum. The study group believed that the notion of structure has been tremendously important in the curriculum ferment of the sixties.

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