Management by Motivation

Management by Motivation

Management by Motivation

Management by Motivation

Excerpt

After the publication Motivation and Productivity, a number of managers said that while it had clarified motivational theory for them, it had not made clear just how these theories might be applied in practical ways to specific problems. Of course, Motivation and Productivity was not intended to serve as a how-to-do-it book and, for that matter, neither is this one. Still, I was troubled by the realization that ideas which my colleagues and I had found to be of great value in our own practical work were not as readily useful to at least some of the people who were -- potentially, at least -- in a position to apply them on a much wider scale.

The motivation for writing this book originated in that troubled feeling. I felt that the task which I had originally set for myself was still incomplete. So I began to consider ways of closing the gap between intention and accomplishment, between explaining theories and applying them. This led me to several conclusions.

If Motivation and Productivity were to have a sequel at all, it should not be a how-to-do-it book, since that would almost necessarily have to oversimplify what the behavioral scientists have learned that is relevant to management. Neither should it simply compile more theory, although there may eventually be a need for that as new research compels revision of existing theories. Instead, the most practical sequel to a theoretical book would be a problem-oriented book -- one that focused on the major managerial problems to which . . .

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