Non-State Actors in World Politics

Non-State Actors in World Politics

Non-State Actors in World Politics

Non-State Actors in World Politics

Synopsis

The involvement of non-state actors in world politics can hardly be characterized as novel, but intensifying economic and social exchange and the emergence of new modes of international governance have given them much greater visibility and, many would argue, a more central role. Non-State Actors in World Politics analyzes a diverse range of economic, social, legal (and illegal), old and new actors, such as the Catholic Church, trade unions, diasporas, religious movements, transnational corporations and organized crime.

Excerpt

The idea for this book originated with William Wallace, who thought a volume on non-state actors that would draw from various areas of international relations was long overdue. In September 1999, we organized a two-day workshop at the London School of Economics and Political Science bringing together experts in the field along with a number of commentators. The result of this gathering, and of subsequent discussions between the participants, is a volume that includes work on economic and social actors, legal and illegal, old-established and new. Drawing on recent research and on the distinctive areas of expertise of 14 contributors, its primary aim is to give the reader a sense of the diversity and complexity of non-state activity across borders, and a better understanding of its impact on national politics and international cooperation.

Our greatest debt goes to our authors, who not only responded to our invitation with enthusiasm but also went through several rounds of revisions promptly and carefully. We also gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the British Academy, and that of the International Relations Department of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Colleagues were supportive throughout, while Katie Harrison and Jennifer Chapa responded to our last-minute requests with their usual cheerfulness and efficiency. Thanks are also due to Alison Howson of Palgrave for shepherding the project, and to two anonymous referees whose comments on the manuscript we found incredibly detailed and helpful in the last stages of editing.


Daphné Josselin . . .

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