Cordially Yours, Brother Cadfael

Cordially Yours, Brother Cadfael

Cordially Yours, Brother Cadfael

Cordially Yours, Brother Cadfael

Synopsis

nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;Detective, monk, father, herbalist, Crusader, sailor, Celt, friend—author Ellis Peters bestows all these attributes on her twelfth-century Benedictine monk-detective Brother Cadfael. As a detective, Cadfael uses his analytic mind to solve crimes and administer justice. As a man of God, he also dispenses mercy along with his famous cordials. nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;Why, essays ask, is a cloistered monk solving murders? How can an author combine a valid detective and an effective healer?

Excerpt

Cloying as Brother Cadfael's cordials and just as sweet, Ellis Peters's tales of the twelfth-century Benedictine Abbey of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Shrewsbury are inscribed in her saga of her soldier-turned-monk, The Chronicles of Brother Cadfael. As varied as the herbs hanging from the ceiling of Brother Cadfael's workshop, some of these tales are as bitter as his potions, some as deadly as his elixirs, some as powerful as his soporifics, some as soothing as his balms, some as potent as his purgatives. But, as enjoyable mysteries, these tales are as restorative as Brother Cadfael's own cordials.

Ellis Peters is no stranger to distant days or distant lands in her writings. Under her real name of Edith Pargeter, she wrote a score of other historical novels, including The Heaven Tree trilogy, the Brothers of Gwynedd novels, and The Bloody Field, which also center on an earlier time and an unfamiliar landscape of the Welsh border. Her translations of Czechoslovak literature, her familiarity with India which appears in several of the Felse family detective novels, and her regular mystery novels endeared her to the reading public. Although the bulk of her work still awaits well-deserved scholarly appraisal, Peters's creation of Brother Cadfael and his world has so enchanted the modern reading public and so entranced the viewing public through the filmed versions that the world of academic scholarship would be amiss to neglect The Chronicles of Brother Cadfael any longer. This book, then, attempts to fill that need by presenting a series of essays on the appreciation of Peters's talents in creating Brother Cadfael and his world, especially in her ability in weaving the two aspects of mystery and ministry into an enjoyable whole.

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