First Principles of the Reformation: Or the Ninety-Five Theses and the Three Primary Works of Dr. Martin Luther

First Principles of the Reformation: Or the Ninety-Five Theses and the Three Primary Works of Dr. Martin Luther

Read FREE!

First Principles of the Reformation: Or the Ninety-Five Theses and the Three Primary Works of Dr. Martin Luther

First Principles of the Reformation: Or the Ninety-Five Theses and the Three Primary Works of Dr. Martin Luther

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The following work, by special arrangement with the London publisher, is now introduced for the first time to American readers by the Lutheran Board of Publication exclusively. It has been most favorably noticed by some of the most influential and discriminating English Reviews. The authors sustain a high reputation for talent and learning, and have devoted their combined strength to the preparation of this work.

Although the last two or three years have been prolific in the production of books on the Reformation, yet comparatively few have appeared in England, and among them this one stands incomparably at the head of the list.

On page xxxiii. there occurs the following passage, which, whilst it does not directly charge our Church with holding the doctrine of Consuhstantiation, yet so nearly approximates it, that it has been thought expedient to furnish readers with the means of refuting the accusation if they should ever have occasion so to do. All intelligent Lutherans know it is false, but they may not always have at hand the direct means of refutation, with which they are here furnished for their use. The sentence alluded to is this :

"It may be worth while to observe, in passing, the position which Luther assumes towards the doctrine of Transubstantiation. What he is concerned to maintain is, that there is a real Presence in the Sacrament. All he is concerned to deny is that Transubstantiation is the necessary explanation of that Presence. In other words, it is not necessary to believe in Transubstantiation in order to believe in the Real Presence. There seems a clear distinction between this view and the formal doctrine of Consubstantiation as afterwards elaborated by Lutheran divines; and Luther's caution, at least in this Treatise, in dealing with so difficult a point, is eminently characteristic of the real moderation with which he formed his views, as distinguished from the energy with which he asserted them. . . ."

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