On the Penitentiary System in the United States and Its Application in France

On the Penitentiary System in the United States and Its Application in France

On the Penitentiary System in the United States and Its Application in France

On the Penitentiary System in the United States and Its Application in France

Excerpt

Early in may, 1831, two young Frenchmen arrived in the United States. Alexis de Tocqueville was twenty-six and Gustave de Beaumont twenty-nine years old. Ostensibly they came —at their own expense—to study prison systems; they had requested a commission for that purpose from de Montalivet, Minister of Interior. But, their interest in prisons was peripheral. The mission would allow them to pursue a plan much closer to their hearts, namely a study on the spot of the social and political institutions of the young republic. Both were scions of old aristocratic families. Their friendship had begun several years earlier, when Tocqueville held an inferior judicial post at Versailles, where his father was prefect, and Beaumont was a substitute in the procurator's office of the King's Bench in Paris. They had together studied history, government and philosophy and had attended lectures at the Sorbonne, where after several years of suspension liberal savants like Guizot, Villemain and Cousin had been allowed to resume their teaching in 1828.

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.