The Making of a Pariah State: The Adventurist Politics of Muammar Qaddafi

The Making of a Pariah State: The Adventurist Politics of Muammar Qaddafi

The Making of a Pariah State: The Adventurist Politics of Muammar Qaddafi

The Making of a Pariah State: The Adventurist Politics of Muammar Qaddafi

Synopsis

The Making of a Pariah State takes the reader behind the flamboyance and apparent irrationality of Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi to expose his attempt to impose national cohesion on the Arab, Muslim, and Third World elements under his leadership. Addressed to the general reader interested in foreign affairs, this timely and unique book provides a coherent framework for understanding why Libya is involved in international terrorism and the danger Qaddafi poses to the Third World and the West.

Excerpt

Throughout their long history, the peoples of Libya have demonstrated an irrepressible desire for independence and self-determination. This drive has proven to be both their greatest strength and their greatest weakness. It was manifested as strength in unrelenting opposition to subjugation by others, and as weakness in a chronic inability to coalesce into the unified political force necessary to preserve the very independence valued so highly.

From the very dawn of recorded Libyan history to contemporary times, there has been an endless stream of peoples and nations who aspired to subdue the country in order to benefit from its important geographic position on the northern coast of Africa. It was this consideration that first brought enterprising traders to the area from Phoenicia on the Lebanese coast, as early as the twelfth century B.C. They established a trading colony at Carthage, in present-day Tunisia, from which they gradually extended their control eastward to the Sirtica Desert. About 800 B.C., they founded the “Land of the Three Cities”—Oea (modern Tripoli), Sabratha, and Labdah (later Leptis Magna)—the land of Tripolitania. The Phoenicians traded gold and precious stones, ebony and ivory, and animals and birds, all of which were to be found deep in the African hinterland, and were made accessible through the north-south caravan routes that ran from the northern coast to sub-Saharan Africa.

From their bases in Tripolitania, the Phoenicians were able to dominate much of the trade of the Mediterranean basin. Envious of the power that the Phoenicians derived from their commanding position on the African coast, in Carthage and Tripolitania, the Hellenes from the . . .

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