Orientpolitik, Value and Civilization: Methodology and History in Anthropology

Orientpolitik, Value and Civilization: Methodology and History in Anthropology

Orientpolitik, Value and Civilization: Methodology and History in Anthropology

Orientpolitik, Value and Civilization: Methodology and History in Anthropology

Synopsis

This second volume of Franz Steiner's writings on anthropology seeks to promote a re-evaluation of his thought by presenting his ideas in their most complete form to date. It includes a newly researched introduction which provides a brief biography.

Excerpt

Stay on the border ... Franz Steiner

Franz Baermann Steiner occupies a unique place in modern anthropology. the fact that his contribution has been recognised by only a handful of influential contemporaries is attributable to his tragically short life, which ended just when he had embarked upon his most mature and innovative writings. Working at the confluence of many of the most significant theories and methodologies of the twentieth century, in the early post-war years — and especially in the all-too-brief period he enjoyed as a Lecturer in Social Anthropology at the Institute of Social Anthropology at the University of Oxford from 1949 until his untimely death in 1952— he had begun to select among these various currents. At this time, he was developing an unprecedented synthesis in mid-century anthropological thought. Broadly speaking, Steiner's thinking stakes out a territory between German post-Enlightenment philosophy, modern linguistics, Marxism, Central European ethnology, German sociology, British social anthropology, and early structuralism. He deploys these resources with a passion for accuracy — which for Steiner is never far removed from an almost Biblical passion for truth, albeit he is often careless of scholarly details — allied to an overriding concern for the right to self-determination of non-Western peoples, among whom he includes his own Jewish people. in their equal concern for geopolitics and detailed local ethnography, his writings foreshadow trends in anthropology that were to become apparent only as . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.