The Phoenix Paradox: A Study of Renewal through Change in the Collected Poems and Last Poems of D.H. Lawrence

The Phoenix Paradox: A Study of Renewal through Change in the Collected Poems and Last Poems of D.H. Lawrence

The Phoenix Paradox: A Study of Renewal through Change in the Collected Poems and Last Poems of D.H. Lawrence

The Phoenix Paradox: A Study of Renewal through Change in the Collected Poems and Last Poems of D.H. Lawrence

Synopsis

This book traces D. H. Lawrence's development as a poet from his earliest to his latest poems. Focusing on the revision of poems in the Collected Poems, 1928, Mandell uncovers the implicit autobiographical narrative that underlies the collection and that dictates its structure.

Lawrence rearranged and rewrote the poems to conform to a chronologic, thematic, and mythic plan, a plan he hints at in the unpublished Foreword to Collected Poems. In its final form, the poetry tells the story of Lawrence's "demon," a figure of his essential self, by recounting the chronological development of the "new" from the "old" self.

Comparing form and content of versions of representative poems from the collection, Mandell analyzes the evaluation not only of Lawrence's poetic style but also of his ideas concerning human and physical nature. She contends that Lawrence was a mature poet with a developed system of poetic and philosophical thought by 1917, when he published Look! We Have Come Through! At that time he rewrote extensively. Through comparison of selected poems, several of which appear in print for the first time, we can reproduce Lawrence's emendations and thus depict the creative mind at work.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.