The Origins of Islamic Reformism in Southeast Asia: Networks of Malay-Indonesian and Middle Eastern 'Ulama' in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

The Origins of Islamic Reformism in Southeast Asia: Networks of Malay-Indonesian and Middle Eastern 'Ulama' in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

The Origins of Islamic Reformism in Southeast Asia: Networks of Malay-Indonesian and Middle Eastern 'Ulama' in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

The Origins of Islamic Reformism in Southeast Asia: Networks of Malay-Indonesian and Middle Eastern 'Ulama' in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

Synopsis

Internationally respected scholar Professor Azyumardi Azra examines the transmission of Islamic reformism from the Middle East to Indonesia during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Excerpt

For many of my friends, publication of this book is long overdue. While the Indonesian edition of the Jaringan Ulamā (‘Ulamā’ networks) has been published in several editions by Mizan (Bandung) since 1994, followed by Arabic translation in 1997, the English version has been delayed for several years. Increased interest in the subject of ‘the transmission of Islamic learning’ from the Middle East to Indonesia or elsewhere in the Muslim world in the past several years has further enhanced the need for publication of this work.

Based mostly on my PhD dissertation at Columbia University in New York City, defended in 1992, most of the research draws on primary sources that have not been considered in detail by other scholars. Although completed 10 years ago, my dissertation has not been available to a nonIndonesian audience and I have been encouraged to present it to a wider readership. An epilogue has been added to take account of some of the more recent research in this field and to add a broader context. The bibliography has been updated with references kindly supplied by Dr Michael Feener (Reed College).

The revisions would not have been possible without the concrete support of a number of friends. Barry Hooker was instrumental not only in providing substantive advice for the improvement of the contents in the light of new scholarly developments on the subject but also in the editing of the manuscript. His wife, Mbak Nia (Virginia Hooker), was also very supportive, and gave me continued encouragement to publish the work in the midst of my almost overwhelming administrative duties as rector of the State Institute for Islamic Studies (IAIN), which on 20 May 2002 was converted into a fully fledged university, the Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University (UIN), Jakarta.

My younger colleagues at the Pusat Pengkajian Islam dan Masyarakat (PPIM) of UIN Jakarta, particularly Jamhari Makruf, Oman Fathurahman . . .

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