The Epigraphy of Death: Studies in the History and Society of Greece and Rome

The Epigraphy of Death: Studies in the History and Society of Greece and Rome

The Epigraphy of Death: Studies in the History and Society of Greece and Rome

The Epigraphy of Death: Studies in the History and Society of Greece and Rome

Synopsis

Tombstones provide the largest single category of epigraphical evidence from the ancient world. However, epigraphy �6 the study of inscriptions �6 remains, for many students of history and archaeology, an abstruse subject. By marrying epigraphy and death, the contributors to this collection hope to encourage a wider audience to consider the importance of inscribed tombstones.

Excerpt

Many books are a team effort, and the Epigraphy of Death is no exception. I would like to thank Professor Stephen Mitchell for many helpful comments on those papers which provided the basis for Chapters Four, Five, Six, and Seven. Professor Gillian Clark and Professor Chris Mee have read and commented on the material in preparation of the book. Professor J. K. Davies made helpful comments on a number of the chapters; Dr Stephen Lambert has made a number of helpful suggestions to the authors of Chapters Three and Four.

Professor E. A. Slater and the School of Archaeology, Classics and Oriental Studies (SACOS) have provided not only support for the conference in January 1995 but also stable employment for myself. During my time at the University of Liverpool, sacos granted me a semester of research leave in 1998 which allowed time for further editorial work on the book. Dr David Blackman, Director of the British School at Athens, the staff of the School and its Library have all been a considerable help in the final stages of the editorial process.

A number of museums and individuals have assisted in supplying and granting permission to publish photographs: Dr Hans R. Goette, Dr Jutta Stroszeck and the German Archaeological Institute in Athens for Figures 2.1, 3.1A and 3.2B; Dr Decker and the Landesmuseum Mainz for Figures 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4 and 6.5; and Alison Wilkins of the Institute of Archaeology, University of Oxford, for her adaptation of the site plan for Figure 2.1.

This collection of essays has been published with the greatest . . .

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