Lyndon Johnson's War: The Road to Stalemate in Vietnam

Lyndon Johnson's War: The Road to Stalemate in Vietnam

Lyndon Johnson's War: The Road to Stalemate in Vietnam

Lyndon Johnson's War: The Road to Stalemate in Vietnam

Synopsis

Lyndon Johnson's war focuses on the repercussions from President Johnson's failure to address the fundamental incompatibility between his political objectives at home and his military objectives in Vietnam.

Excerpt

progress (n. prog'res or, esp. Brit., pro'gres), n. 1. movement toward a specific goal or a further stage. 2. development or cumulative improvement as of an individual or a civilization. 3. forward or onward movement in space or time.

stalemate (stal'mat'), n. v. -mat-ed, -mat-ing. -n. 1. Chess. a position in which a player cannot move any piece except his king and cannot move his king without putting it in check, the result being a draw. 2. any position or situation in which no action can be taken.

The Random House Dictionary of the English Language. The College Edition

In his January 1967 State of the Union address, the president spoke somewhat guardedly but nevertheless optimistically of the war against aggression in Vietnam. President Johnson assured the American public that General Westmoreland believed the enemy could no longer succeed on the battlefield. "I wish I could report to you that the conflict is almost over. This I cannot do. We face more cost, more loss, and more agony. For the end is not yet. I cannot promise you that it will come this year—or come next year. Our adversary still believes, I think, tonight that he can go on fighting longer than we . . .

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