The Problem of Social-Scientific Knowledge

The Problem of Social-Scientific Knowledge

The Problem of Social-Scientific Knowledge

The Problem of Social-Scientific Knowledge

Excerpt

When a book bears such an ambitious title as The Problem of Social-Scientific Knowledge, its scope and aim should be clarified at the outset. A social scientist who has been arduously engaged in the difficult search for knowledge within the limited area of his own discipline, may protest that it is meaningless for a philosopher to discuss the problem of knowledge for the social-scientific enterprise as a whole. Now he would be right, if it were my intention to present a conglomeration of the research problems of psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics, political science, and history. Since I am not an expert in any one of these fields, it should be clearly understood that at no point in this study shall I presume to pose or solve the specialist's research problems.

It is to another dimension of the problem of obtaining reliable knowledge about human behavior, that this book directs attention. In an attempt to answer the basic question of what kind of socialscientific knowledge is meaningful, I shall suggest an epistemological pattern of reflective inquiry from which I believe the techniques of . . .

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