Asian Students' Classroom Communication Patterns in U.S. Universities: An Emic Perspective

Asian Students' Classroom Communication Patterns in U.S. Universities: An Emic Perspective

Asian Students' Classroom Communication Patterns in U.S. Universities: An Emic Perspective

Asian Students' Classroom Communication Patterns in U.S. Universities: An Emic Perspective

Synopsis

The past decade has witnessed a steady increase in the numbers of Asian students in North American institutions of higher learning. While their academic success has been widely recognized, concerns about their silence in classrooms have also been expressed by educators. Following an overview of Asian students in North American higher education, this book presents a focused ethnographic study of twenty Asian graduate students enrolled in a major US university.

Excerpt

Asian Students’ Classroom Communication Patterns in U.S. Universities examines what adaptive cultural transformation means to Asian students and what Asian students’ adaptive cultural transformation means to those around them by focusing on one social and academic setting: content classes in American colleges and universities where Asian students are immersed with American students and other international students. This book has three goals. The first goal is to explore and describe Asian students’ classroom communication patterns through their oral classroom participation modes in their content courses with reference of their perceptions of classroom participation as influenced by the interaction among sociocultural, linguistic, cognitive, affective, and pedagogical factors. The second goal is to explain and interpret Asian students’ classroom communication patterns in association with their various perceptions from an emic perspective. The third goal is to call for Asian students’ awareness and acquisition of adaptive cultural transformation competence. Because of my own journey of adaptive cultural transformation from an Asian student to an Asian professor in the United States, I believe that Asian students should strive to achieve adaptive cultural transformation competence consisting of social identity negotiation skills, cultural-sensitivity knowledge and mindful reflexivity, and communicative competence. Asian students’ construction of their cultural transformation competence also necessitates understanding and support from various communities in the target culture, including ESL and content course instructors, American peers and other international students, American college and university administrators, and other professional resources.

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