The Restoration of Learning: A Program for Redeeming the Unfulfilled Promise of American Education

The Restoration of Learning: A Program for Redeeming the Unfulfilled Promise of American Education

The Restoration of Learning: A Program for Redeeming the Unfulfilled Promise of American Education

The Restoration of Learning: A Program for Redeeming the Unfulfilled Promise of American Education

Excerpt

In November 1953 I published a book entitled Educational Wastelands, the subtitle of which spoke of "the retreat from learning" in American education. My conviction that the retreat could be halted finds expression in the title of the present volume. Specific proposals for action are offered in the eleven chapters of Part III, the largest section of the book.

These proposals follow from the philosophy of education propounded in my earlier work, and they are designed to correct the defects in contemporary American education which I there criticized. To avoid exasperating the reader with endless references to another publication, and at the same time to present my argument as a single continuous whole, I have incorporated in The Restoration of Learning substantial passages from Educational Wastelands. With unparalleled generosity, the publishers of the latter work have surrendered their copyright to enable me to do so.

The Restoration of Learning is offered as a new work, not a revision of the old, though it does preserve the most important parts of the latter. Fifteen of the present twenty-nine chapters deal with matters that were touched on lightly, if at all, in Educational Wastelands. They are completely new, save for an occasional paragraph that has been borrowed from the earlier work and made use of in a different context. Though some seven chapters have been included in substantially their original form, they have been fitted into their proper places in the ampler statement here presented. The remaining seven chapters are recognizably based upon ones that appeared in Educational Wastelands, but they have been so completely reorganized and so frequently supplemented with new material as to be, to all intents and purposes, new.

In Part I of the present book I attempt to describe as clearly and completely as possible the kind of education that I think essential for democratic America in the mid-twentieth century. Two chapters (3 and . . .

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