Political Science: The Science of Politics

Political Science: The Science of Politics

Political Science: The Science of Politics

Political Science: The Science of Politics

Excerpt

When American Political Science Association President-Elect William H. Riker appointed me Program Chairperson of the 1983 Annual Meeting of the Association, we chose as a theme for the meetings "The Science of Politics." The 1982 Annual Meetings had focused on "The State of the Discipline," leading to Ada W. Finifter's excellent collection of the theme papers from those meetings in the APSA book Political Science: The State of the Discipline. For the 1983 meetings we wanted to build on the very successful 1982 experience, while focusing attention more specifically on the scientific elements of the discipline and encouraging reflection on its scientific status.

Not only did papers presented at the 1983 meetings extend the science of politics, but several panels were specifically devoted to assessing the status of science in the study of politics. In particular, the Lasswell Symposium on the second evening of the convention had "The Science of Politics" as its topic, and special "theme panels" were organized for each of the 23 regular sections of the official program on the science of politics as applied to that section of the discipline. The theme papers included in this volume originated at those special sessions.

It seemed desirable to publish the theme papers from the 1983 meetings, given the excellent reception of the Finifter volume cited above. However, the Publications Committee of the Association wanted to further evaluate the success of that volume, so it was decided to seek a commercial publisher for a collection of the 1983 theme papers. Unfortunately, the large number of papers meant that the resulting volume would be too large. Rather than condense the many papers on all the topics into a single book, the decision was made to publish those papers which focus on political institutions and behavior. Thus the important scientific work being done in international relations, comparative politics, public policy, and the study of race, gender, and ethnicity issues cannot be considered here. While we regret that more comprehensive coverage was not possible, the in-depth analysis of the state of science in the areas included helps make up for this loss.

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.