Christianity and the Scientist

Christianity and the Scientist

Christianity and the Scientist

Christianity and the Scientist

Excerpt

Recollection of the sometimes bitter struggles between science and religion during the past four or five centuries leads many people to suppose that the life and work of a scientist is a purely secular affair. To be sure, many scientists belong to Christian churches, but their relation to the church is kept in one compartment of their thinking and their relationship to their job is kept in another.

The day is past when natural scientists as a group are predominately opposed to religion, if indeed it ever existed at all. Nevertheless, many scientists are perplexed as to just how the vocation of a scientist has meaning as a Christian calling. Much has been written about science and religion in general, but little has appeared to help scientists find Christian meaning in their jobs as scientists. It is one thing to justify the intellectual validity of the scientific enterprise; it is another to understand that enterprise as a positive avenue of service to God.

The following discussion is an effort to point the ways along which the life of the scientist--in research or teaching, in industrial, collegiate, or governmental service--can be so understood and so conducted as to make it a worthy means of expressing Christian discipleship. There are no spectacular suggestions here, no formulae for putting God into the laboratory, no reliance upon patterns of behavior unacceptable to . . .

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