Iraq under Siege: The Deadly Impact of Sanctions and War

Iraq under Siege: The Deadly Impact of Sanctions and War

Iraq under Siege: The Deadly Impact of Sanctions and War

Iraq under Siege: The Deadly Impact of Sanctions and War

Excerpt

In October 1999, the United States government faced a "dilemma" in Iraq. "After eight years of enforcing a 'no-fly zone' in northern [and southern] Iraq, few military targets remain," explained the Wall Street Journal. "We're down to the last outhouse," one unnamed US official protested. "There are still some things left, but not many," noted another Pentagon source.

The fact that the United Kingdom and United States have been unilaterally bombing Iraq almost every other day since December 1998 has generally merited only one-paragraph notices in the New York Times' World Briefing section. In a rare instance when the bombing made the front page, the Times acknowledged,

American warplanes have methodically and with virtually no public discussion been attacking Iraq.

In the last eight months, American and British pilots have fired more than 1,100 missiles against 359 targets in Iraq.

This is triple the number of targets attacked in four furious days of strikes [on Iraq] in December [1998]....

By another measure, pilots have flown about two-thirds as many missions as Nato pilots flew over Yugoslavia in seventy-eight days of around-the-clock war there [in 1999].

By the end of 1999, US and UK forces had flown more than 6,000 sorties, dropped more than 1,800 bombs, and hit more than 450 targets. The Pentagon alone spent more than $1 billion to maintain its force of 200 airplanes, nineteen warships, and 22,000 troops who are part of the operation.

The war on Iraq is "the longest sustained US air operation since the Vietnam War." As in Vietnam, the US government, with the help of its . . .

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