Larry McMurtry and the West: An Ambivalent Relationship

Larry McMurtry and the West: An Ambivalent Relationship

Larry McMurtry and the West: An Ambivalent Relationship

Larry McMurtry and the West: An Ambivalent Relationship

Excerpt

The purpose of this study is to examine Larry McMurtry's writing career in order to establish the significance of his relationship with his home region. My thesis is that McMurtry's writing is characterized by a deep ambivalence toward his home territory, a vacillation that cuts through his work and his attitudes about writing itself. The course of his career demonstrates his shifting attitudes that have led him toward, away, and then back again to his home territory and the "cowboy god" that dominates its mythology.

Over the years McMurtry has increasingly been perceived as eccentric, aloof, and somewhat ornery, most recently tending to avoid interviews and refusing to hit the promotion circuit. But of all the people I would like to thank for help with this project, I first need to acknowledge Larry McMurtry for generously giving the time to talk with me about his work and exchanging faxes with me, as technology continues to touch research in different ways. I would also like to acknowledge the help of the rest of the McMurtrys—Sue, Judy, and Charlie. Sue Deen and the group at the Blue Pig book store in Archer City welcomed me graciously. I would also like to thank Ken Kesey, whom Larry calls the "last wagon master," for the evening at our house in Wimberley, Texas, talking books . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.