Globalization and National Identities: Crisis or Opportunity?

Globalization and National Identities: Crisis or Opportunity?

Globalization and National Identities: Crisis or Opportunity?

Globalization and National Identities: Crisis or Opportunity?

Synopsis

Drawing on original research from social scientists working on twelve countries, this book explores the key issues faced by nations and citizens as they struggle to rediscover, reaffirm or reconstruct their sense of national identities in the face of globalizing forces. Some nations and peoples experience the fragmentation of once certain identities as threatening and likely to generate political and social breakdown. Others encounter globalization as a challenge which brings uncertainties but also opportunities for adaptation, the evolution of hybrid identities or new forms of protest.

Excerpt

The theme for this book emerged from the papers originally given at an interdisciplinary conference organized around the theme of ‘globalization and identities’. This was organized by the Institute for Global Studies and the Department of Sociology at Manchester Metropolitan University and was held in the summer of 1999. Although sociologists formed the core of the participants, people from other social science disciplines also made major contributions, including political scientists, art historians, geographers and anthropologists. This spread of scholarship is partly reflected in our choice of contributors to this book so that at least four chapters were written by scholars who, if compelled to do so, would probably label themselves as political scientists — though ones with leanings towards history, political economy and sociology. Indeed, and strange though it may seem, not only did the interdisciplinary nature of the conference present few if any serious problems, it actually proved to be one of the occasion’s great strengths. For one thing, our common interest in and focus on global themes linked to the issue of identities proved more than equal to the task of enabling us to engage in a fruitful dialogue across the discipline lines without encountering problems of understanding — or misunderstanding. But, in addition, the very multifaceted nature of globalization — pulling us in its wake as it crosses all boundaries, re-scrambling our experiences and exposing us endlessly to new connections — is such that it compels most of those who become embroiled in its study to gain at least some familiarity with other disciplines to the mutual benefit of everyone working in this field.

We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all those who attended the conference: both those who gave papers and those who attended the sessions and showed such a lively interest. Everyone who came contributed towards making the 1999 conference a truly rewarding and enjoyable experience. However, we would especially like to thank Martin Albrow for his inspirational address and warm encouragement.

CATHERINE J. DANKS and PAUL KENNEDY Manchester Metropolitan University . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.