Financing for Development: Proposals from Business and Civil Society

Financing for Development: Proposals from Business and Civil Society

Financing for Development: Proposals from Business and Civil Society

Financing for Development: Proposals from Business and Civil Society

Synopsis

In this publication, 21 authors including business executives and civil-society activists from developing and developed countries, address the question of how to boost the financing of development. Issues discussed include: micro credit and large-scale project finance; gender and poverty; bridging the digital divide; local and global environments for investment; domestic and international taxation; trade expansion; debt relief; official development assistance; and reform of the United Nations.

Excerpt

We live in an era of rapid change. One central component of that change is the process of globalization. Globalization has created enormous wealth for some in many parts of the world, but it has also left many behind. NGOs have been at the forefront of pointing to the downsides of globalization, whether it was through articles, the Internet or, more recently, the streets of Seattle and Genoa. Regrettably, this has at times been accompanied by violence.

There are legitimate concerns about the workings of the world economy, the depth of poverty, inequalities and marginalization. The United Nations is in a unique position to engage in a constructive dialogue, not only with those who are most critical of the workings of the international economy, but also with those who drive the international economy, i.e., the business sector.

The United Nations is currently preparing for an unprecedented conference that addresses the interlocking issues of financing and development in the context of globalization. This International Conference on Financing for Development, to be held in Monterrey, Mexico in March 2002, offers an extremely important opportunity to create a new international partnership for a more equitable economic and financial governance of the world economy. This partnership cannot be reached without the participation of “all relevant stakeholders”. This, of course, includes the Governments of the Member States of the United Nations and all appropriate official international organizations, but it also includes the business sector and civil society.

The present book is a case in point. Compiled after hearings held in the General Assembly as part of the preparatory process for the International Con-

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