Enhancing Global Governance: Towards a New Diplomacy?

Enhancing Global Governance: Towards a New Diplomacy?

Enhancing Global Governance: Towards a New Diplomacy?

Enhancing Global Governance: Towards a New Diplomacy?

Synopsis

This publication analyses the means by which global governance has been promoted by innovative diplomatic practices, especially issue-specific coalitions among like-minded countries and civil society organisations. The key theme running through the book is a consideration of how these alternative leadership forms have been expressed through the United Nations system, together with an evaluation of the impact they have achieved. It looks at the accumulating frustrations with the P5 leadership in the UN Security Council as a prelude to a discussion of two case studies: the development of the Ottawa Treaty to ban anti-personnel landmines and the campaign to establish an international court. It also reviews the application of new diplomacy in terms of commercial activities and the emerging new security agenda.

Excerpt

This edited collection is derived from papers presented at two conferences, one in Canada in September 1999 and another in Japan in July 2000. The conferences focused on the theme of the United Nations and “new diplomacy”. Participants at these conferences analysed both the structural and the situational conditions opening up (and imposing constraints) on a diplomacy that is changing in form, scope, and intensity. The operating assumption guiding the research project was that alternative sources of innovation were developing through bottom-up modes of leadership from both so-called “like-minded” states and the enhanced role of civil society in contemporary diplomacy. The questions of how and where these alternative leadership forms were expressed through the UN system underpinned the papers and the discussion.

To gain a better insight into this dynamic the Canadian conference examined two specific cases, namely the development of the Ottawa Treaty to ban anti-personnel land-mines and the campaign to establish an international criminal court. In the case of the land-mines initiative, the triggering effect of organizational frustration was brought to the fore. Deemed to be an inadequate means of resolution, several states and a variety of NGOs mounted what can be called an “end run” around the Conference on Disarmament. In some ways, therefore, the land-mines case represented a challenge to the established powe/institutional structure. In other ways, though, the case demonstrates the capacity of the UN system to allow improvisation and innovation. Similar lessons can be drawn . . .

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