The New Poet: Novelty and Tradition in Spenser's Complaints

The New Poet: Novelty and Tradition in Spenser's Complaints

The New Poet: Novelty and Tradition in Spenser's Complaints

The New Poet: Novelty and Tradition in Spenser's Complaints

Synopsis

This gracefully written and well thought-out study deals with a neglected collection of poems by Spenser, which was issued in 1591 at the height of his career. While there has been a good deal written in recent years on two of the poems in the collection, "Mother Hubberd’s Tale" and "Muiopotmos", Brown innovatively addresses the collection in its entirety. He urges us to see it as a planned whole with a consistent design on the reader: he fully acknowledges, and even brings out further, the heterogeneity of the collection, but he examines it nevertheless as a sustained reflection on the nature of poetry and the auspices for writing in a modern world, distancing itself from the traditions of the immediate past. The strength of this work lies both in the originality of its project and in the precision and enterprise of the close reading that informs its argument. Interest in the concern of Spenser’s poetry with the nature of poetry is in the current critical mainstream, but here the attentiveness is both unusually focused and unusually sustained. Brown garners more than would be expected from the translations in the Complaints, while at the same time including striking and individual chapters on the better known "Mother Hubberd’s Tale" and "Muiopotmos"; he advances understanding of these extremely subtle texts and fully justifies his wider approach to the collection as a whole. Arguing that Spenser’s relationship to literary tradition is more complex than is often thought, Brown suggests that Spenser was a self-conscious innovator whose gradual move away from traditional poetics is exhibited by the different texts in the Complaints. He further suggests that the Complaints are a "poetics in practice", which progress from traditional ideas of poetry to a new poetry that emerges through Spenser’s transformation of traditional complaint.

Excerpt

This book is a modest monument to my ten year long enthusiasm for the poetry of Edmund Spenser. Though strictly a work of literary history, it necessarily embodies my sense of Spenser's aesthetic excellence; I hope that at the very least, these ‘vaine labours of terrestriall wit’ may encourage others to explore the diversity of Spenser's artistic achievements.

This study argues that Spenser's relationship to literary tradition is more complex than is usually thought. Through a detailed reading of the Complaints, I suggest that Spenser was a self-conscious innovator, whose gradual move away from traditional poetics is exhibited by these different texts. I suggest that the Complaints are a ‘poetics in practice’, which progress from traditional ideas of poetry to a new poetry which emerges through Spenser's transformation of traditional complaint.

The Introduction reviews scholarly reconstructions of the first publication of the Complaints volume in 1591, and investigates the traditional poetics and forms of complaint poetry available to Spenser. The study is then divided into two parts. Part One considers the translations included in Complaints as traditional texts which demonstrate Spenser's ability to replicate conventional complaint and his understanding of received notions of poetic meaning. In the Chapter 1 I read Virgils Gnat as at once a faithful translation of the pseudo-Virgilian Culex, and an autobiographical appropriation of its primary allegory, retaining a basic confidence in traditional theories of allegory. In Chapter 2, I argue that Ruines of Rome exhibits both Spenser's desire to emulate the achievements of Du Bellay in English, and his concern to differentiate his own poetry doctrinally from Du Bellay's troubling precedent.

Part Two explores the major, or Spenserian, Complaints as a development from these traditional positions to the innovative practice of Mother Hubberds Tale and Muiopotmos. In Chapter 3 I argue that The Ruines of Time is a self-consciously transitional text, which voices the . . .

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