Melville's Evermoving Dawn: Centennial Essays

Melville's Evermoving Dawn: Centennial Essays

Melville's Evermoving Dawn: Centennial Essays

Melville's Evermoving Dawn: Centennial Essays

Synopsis

Melville's Evermoving Dawn contains some of the best writing and thinking on Melville today. Represented here are scholars young and old, traditionalists and new historicists, who gathered at several conferences and venues throughout 1991, the centennial of Herman Melville's death. Meetings occured in Pittsfield, Massachusetts (where Melville wrote Moby-Dick, Pierre, and other works), New York City during Melville week (Sept. 22-28), and Washington, DC, at the Theater of the National Archives. The essays survey the past and present of Melville studies and suggest directions for the future.

Excerpt

Robert Milder

The essays in this volume are the partial fruit of three separate celebrations arranged by the Melville Society in honor of the 1991 centennial of Melville's death and organized and overseen by the chair of the Centennial Committee, Thomas F. Heffernan, along with Ruth Degenhardt of the Berkshire Athenaeum (Pittsfield), John Bryant, and Mary K. Bercaw Edwards. the first conference, held on May 16-18 in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, not far from Melville's Arrowhead home, was organized by Ms. Degenhardt and hosted by the Athenaeum; Program Chair Robert Milder defined the topics and assembled the panels of speakers. the second commemoration, a series of activities and programs organized by Professors Heffernan and Bryant, took place in New York City during "Melville Week" (September 22-28) as proclaimed by Mayor David Dinkins; it featured sessions on scholarly and textual problems, on Melville and race, and on Melville's Pierre and Pierre's New York. Participating institutions included the American Museum of Natural History, the New York Public Library, the Schomburg Center for Research in African American Culture, and the New-York Historical Society. the final conference, arranged by Professor Heffernan and staged in the theater of the National Archives in Washington, D.C., on October 7, focused on Melville as . . .

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