Africa in the United Nations

Africa in the United Nations

Africa in the United Nations

Africa in the United Nations

Excerpt

To what degree does Africa in the United Nations present a unified voice and impact? To what degree is the African personality in the United Nations divided? How is Africa organized in the United Nations? The purpose of this chapter is to explore the nature and extent of the African caucusing groups as well as possible African factions in the United Nations. The caucusing groups are examined first because they are formally organized, the factions later because their existence may be more imaginary than actual.

By October 1962 the thirty-three African states in the United Nations constituted 30.1 per cent of the membership of the organization. Behind the formal structure of the United Nations these states were organized into three caucusing groups that participated in the process of political negotiation. In addition, African states belonged to three other caucusing groups. On Figure 4, which shows how the membership of the United Nations is organized into caucusing blocs and groups, it can be seen that the African group, the Casablanca group, and the Brazzaville group are composed wholly of African states, while some African states also belong to the Arab group and the Commonwealth group. Furthermore, all the independent African states (i.e., members of the Conference of Independent African States) are members of the Afro-Asian group. Only one African state does not now belong to any caucusing group in the United Nations--the Republic of South Africa--although it was a member of the Commonwealth group until it withdrew from the Commonwealth in May 1961. Beyond these formalized political groupings it is apparent, from a consideration of the development of international relations in . . .

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