America's Children

America's Children

America's Children

America's Children

Excerpt

This is a book about children and youth in the United States in relation to some of their social and economic characteristics. It is a statistical analysis based chiefly on the 1950 Census of Population and a few more recent sample surveys of the Nation's population. The aim of the study is to distill from a mass of statistical materials some picture of the interrelatedness of selected characteristics of children, such as geographic location, education, work activity, color, etc. The scope of the study and the characteristics investigated are necessarily defined and limited by the data utilized. Chapter 1 discusses these limitations and definitions in greater detail.

I am grateful to the Social Science Research Council and the Bureau of the Census for making this study possible and to the Council's Committee on Census Monographs for its patience in supporting and encouraging the study through its long path from beginning to end. I am particularly indebted to the Russell Sage Foundation for allowing me the use of its office and staff facilities, especially for the expert typing services of Mary B. McGark and Dorothy Jung. I am also grateful to Dr. Leonard Broom of the Department of Anthropology and Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles, for making possible the use of the library and departmental facilities.

The manuscript was critically reviewed by Reuben Hill of the University of North Carolina, Dr. Conrad Taeuber of the Bureau of the Census, Dr. Ralph Hurlin of the Russell Sage Foundation, and Paul Webbink of the Social Science Research Council. Their criticisms and suggestions helped in the elimination of many errors and misinterpretations and in the expansion of many other areas of analysis. From the early preparation to the final stages of the study the advice of Howard G. Brunsman, Henry S. Shryock, Jr., and Paul C. Glick, all of the Bureau of the Census, helped considerably in the proper use and interpretation of the data. The many discussions with Robert O. Carleton, formerly with the Bureau of Applied Social Research, Columbia University, yielded the model of analysis employed in Chapter 8. The overall and continuing assistance of James N. Ypsilantis, University of Massachusetts, and his particular contributions to Chapters 5 and 6 warrant especial and grateful acknowledgment. The full responsibility for the shortcomings of the study is, of course, mine.

Malibu, California ELEANOR H. BERNERT

December 1957.

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