Future Armies, Future Challenges: Land Warfare in the Information Age

Future Armies, Future Challenges: Land Warfare in the Information Age

Future Armies, Future Challenges: Land Warfare in the Information Age

Future Armies, Future Challenges: Land Warfare in the Information Age

Synopsis

Contributions from some of the world's leading strategic thinkers on land warfare are collected in the work. The operational, strategic, and ethical conundrums that soldiers, their commanders, and the societies they serve will have to wrestle with in the future are analyzed by the experts, paying close attention to the impact of the information age. Topics such as urban warfare, coalition operations, the revolution in military affairs, asymmetric warfare, close combat, peacekeeping, military training and recruiting, and the challenges posed by terrorism are addressed.

Excerpt

The October 2001 Chief of Army's Land Warfare Conference on the theme of ‘Future Armies, Future Challenges: Land Warfare in the Information Age’ was held less than a month after the tragic terrorist attacks of 11 September in the United States. As a result, the subject matter of the conference, the future of land warfare, could not have been more grimly realistic. the deliberations of the conference were undertaken by a group of eminent Australian, American, British, French and Indian defence scholars and military practitioners, and took place against an ominous background of preparation for an international military campaign against the Taliban regime and the al-Qa'ida movement in Afghanistan.

The speedy success of the US-led international coalition in removing the Taliban and destroying al-Qa'ida's presence in Afghanistan demonstrated the continuing value of land forces in the age of cruise missiles and stealth technology. As several of the essays in this book make clear, land power remains fundamental to the success of joint operations. It is worth remembering that one of the most memorable justifications for the role of the soldier in war was made by an eminent American sailor, Rear Admiral J. C. Wylie. in 1967, when pondering the ultima ratio of strategy, Wylie wrote, ‘the ultimate determinant in war is the man on the scene with the gun. This man is the final power in war. He is in control. He determines who wins’

The 2001 Conference examined three broad themes, all of which are reflected in these proceedings. the first of these themes was the changing . . .

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