Women, the State, and Development

Women, the State, and Development

Women, the State, and Development

Women, the State, and Development

Synopsis

This book reflects the most current scholarship on states, socioeconomic development, and feminist theory to emerge this decade. Addressed are issues such as the role of state policies and ideologies in defining gender differences, state influence over the boundaries between public and domestic spheres, state control over women's productive and reproductive lives, and the efforts of women to influence state policy.

Women, the State, and Development shows that state elites promote male domination as one way of maintaining social order when nation-states are created and strengthened, and that issues defined as male by the sexual division of labor are given priority in state policies that promote security and economic development such as foreign policy, international trade, agricultural development, and resource extraction. It analyzes these policies in terms of their impact on gender relations and also identifies ways in which women have responded."

Excerpt

The editors and principal authors of this book are political scientists and feminists with particular interests in comparative politics, area studies, feminist theory, and development. We began communicating with each other through mutual involvement in the interdisciplinary field of women and development. We shared the recognition characterizing this field that the process of development affects people differently, depending on their class and ethnicity and, of course, their gender. We also recognized that the insights that have emerged from both feminist theory and from women and development studies, whether conceptual or applied, have remained largely isolated from much new thinking in the social sciences. In particular, the "rediscovery" of the state by political scientists in the 1980s occurred with virtually no reference to the differential impact of state ideology, institutions, and policies on women and men. Overall, studies in comparative politics are especially devoid of sensitivity to gender issues.

This book, then, is designed to be a catalyst for the belated process of feminist reconceptualization of the state, with particular attention given to the linkage between states, women, and socioeconomic development. Our collective work began in 1984, when Jana Everett and Sue Ellen M. Charlton drafted the initial proposal of a comparative politics panel on women, development, and the state for the 1985 American Political Science Association Annual Meeting in New Orleans. The earliest drafts of our chapters on Western Europe and India, along with Kathleen Staudt's on colonial Africa, were presented at that time. The panel, chaired by Judith . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.