Fathers and Sons in Virgil's Aeneid: Tum Genitor Natum

Fathers and Sons in Virgil's Aeneid: Tum Genitor Natum

Fathers and Sons in Virgil's Aeneid: Tum Genitor Natum

Fathers and Sons in Virgil's Aeneid: Tum Genitor Natum

Excerpt

Virgil is a writer the Latinist reads early, lives his life with, and often comes late to love. Through the years I have read him for myself far more than I have read him with or written on him for others. These are in fact the first pages I have ever published on the Aeneid, and the tone throughout them is personal. In the first sentence I speak in the first person. This is unusual and perhaps will be thought unacceptable in a book presented by a university press. But I have not written a work of scholarship. I have used footnotes mainly to support and in some cases to qualify statements which are likely to strike the wissenschaftlich Virgilian as strange if not altogether inappropriate. I have touched on subjects which may appear peripheral to my argument until the final chapters are reached. And I have, throughout, been subjective in my response to a poet we have been taught of late to read for his subjective responses. A recent introduction to the Aeneid makes a distinction between what a commentator may say and what an individual can find and respond to. I want to cross that line. So I have spoken as an individual.

A good portion of my text is devoted to a book-by-book narrative summary of Virgil's poem. Something similar has already been done in at least three other volumes written in English on the Aeneid in the last few years. I can only say that, like the authors of those volumes, I found this the only . . .

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