The Remaking of Pittsburgh: Class and Culture in an Industrializing City 1877-1919

The Remaking of Pittsburgh: Class and Culture in an Industrializing City 1877-1919

The Remaking of Pittsburgh: Class and Culture in an Industrializing City 1877-1919

The Remaking of Pittsburgh: Class and Culture in an Industrializing City 1877-1919

Synopsis

Too much emotion and insufficient fact. This paradox has long characterized the controversy surrounding animal research.

Of Mice, Models, and Men is the first exhaustive treatment of all areas empirical and conceptual relevant to the use of animals in research. It is also the first study to combine regard for the welfare of laboratory animals with a knowledgeable acceptance of the continuing need for research involving animals.

The book has another rare quality. It is virtually devoid of any of the emotional and exaggerated attacks that have characterized many of the other publications in this area. Instead, it presents, in a manner accessible to both sides, all the relevant historical, social, and scientific information required to form an opinion on the subject. The book thus achieves a most difficult goal that of bridging the gap between researchers using animals and animal welfare advocates, while pointing out the need for a more active program to promote laboratory animal welfare."

Excerpt

For workingmen in Pittsburgh, the 1877 upheaval had been a spur to organization and a demonstration of labor's power in the local community. While leaders such as Humphreys, Armstrong, Davis, and Burtt strongly condemned the arson and random violence that accompanied the strike, they saw such activities as regrettable excesses, the cure for which was further organization. Most respectable citizens held a similar view or remained silent. Among a growing minority, however, the specter of the Paris commune evinced a more militant response. The upheaval convinced them that neither the labor leadership nor the local police (especially when commanded by a mayor like William C. McCarthy) could be counted on to restrain the plebeian population. At the same time, however, local government was becoming more insulated from citizen initiatives of any kind. Advocates of law and order therefore sought both to outflank and to reform local government.

Shortly after the 1877 upheaval, Pittsburgh businessmen joined their peers in other industrial cities in a successful movement to transform the weak state militia into a strong National Guard. The focus of their efforts was the state legislature. There, rural legislators hardly needed to be convinced of the need for a strong constabulary; and other legislators found public revulsion against violence--and sizeable contribution from business lobbyists--sufficiently persuasive. The Guard they created proved itself for the next half-century a reliable ally of corporations, a predictable enemy of labor. Financed . . .

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