Jung and Eastern Thought

Jung and Eastern Thought

Jung and Eastern Thought

Jung and Eastern Thought

Synopsis

Jung and Eastern Thought is an assessment of the impact of the East on Jung's life and teaching. Along with the strong and continuing interest in the psychology of Carl Jung is a growing awareness of the extent to which Eastern thought, especially Indian ideas, influenced his thinking. This book identifies those influences that he found useful and those he rejected.

In Hindu, Buddhist, and Taoist cultures, yoga is a central conception and practice. Jung was at once fascinated and critical of yoga. Part I of the book examines Jung's encounter with yoga and his strong warning against the uncritical adoption of yoga by the modern West. In Part II Jung's love/hate relationship with Eastern thought is examined in light of his attitude toward karma and rebirth, Kundalini yoga, mysticism, and Patanjali's Yoga Sutras.

Coward's observations are rounded out by contributions from J. Borelli and J. Jordens. Dr. Borelli's Annotated Bibliography is an invaluable contribution to bibliographic material on Jung, yoga, and Eastern religion. A special feature is the Introduction by Joseph Henderson, Jung's most senior North American student and one of the few Jungians to have recognized the important influence of the East on Jung's thinking."

Excerpt

Along with the strong and continuing interest in the psychology of Carl Jung is the growing awareness of the extent to which Eastern thought—especially from India—influenced his thinking.Jung's own followers have not shown a readiness to examine the Eastern contribution to his thinking, tending instead to focus on his Western roots. This book is a serious scholarly attempt to fill that gap—to identify where Jung received Eastern influence, when he drew the line and drew back from the East, and to assess the overall impact of Eastern thought on his life and teaching.

Although the main body of the book (Chapters 1-3 and 5-7) is the result of my own research, I have included two excellent articles by Professor Jordens, and one article and an annotated bibliography by Dr. J. Borelli.Although he worked quite independently from me, Professor Jordens has taken a very similar line of analysis and provides findings which in general support my own, although on one important point differ—namely in giving Jung, at times, a more positive attitude towards the practice of yoga, and a more positive assessment of the nature of the highest yogic states.Dr. Borelli's article also addresses the same issue but from a different angle. His annotated bibliography is a helpful resource for scholars wanting to do further work in this area.

Professor Joseph Henderson is a senior and highly respected student of Carl Jung.It is a privilege to have him introduce this volume. He is one of the few Jungians to have given . . .

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