Law in Literature: Legal Themes in Novellas

Law in Literature: Legal Themes in Novellas

Law in Literature: Legal Themes in Novellas

Law in Literature: Legal Themes in Novellas

Synopsis

This new anthology is the third in a series of Law in Literature collections and is intended as a companion and supplement to "Law in Literature: Legal Themes in Short Stories" and "Law in Literature: Legal Themes in Drama." The eight works included in this anthology were chosen to illustrate important legal themes and to show the way in which the law forces individuals to confront existential dilemmas and the questing for right answers.

Excerpt

Legal Themes in Novellas follows Legal Themes in Short Stories and Legal Themes in Drama in a series of Law in Literature anthologies. "Novella" is a term loosely used to describe works that are either long short stories or short novels, the latter also being known as novelettes. the eight works comprising this anthology have been included here under the title Legal Themes in Novellas after much deliberation. They are not all long short stories, and they are not all short novels. One might even argue that Willa Cather's O Pioneers! is quite simply a novel and not a short novel, even less so a novella. Yet O Pioneers ! is about the same length as other works—one example is Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby—which have been called novelettes at one time or another, so it seems appropriate to include it in this anthology as a novella. From a practical point of view, it was hard to imagine a book with the title Law in Literature: Legal Themes in Short Stories, Long Short Stories, Short Novels and Novels. Rubrics are so useful, even if they are difficult to master at times!

The time period of the eight works included here covers a seventy-five year period from 1838 to 1913. Once again, there was a sense that perhaps O Pioneers! should have been replaced with a nineteenth century work in order to have been able to give the book the title of Law in Literature: Legal Themes in 19th Century Novellas, but such manipulation of fitting works into centuries serves no legitimate purpose. If it did, then one might suppose that contemporary authors might hold off publishing their upcoming works for a few years in order to have them included in anthologies of the twenty-first century, or perhaps they might rush publication in order to have their works included in twentieth century anthologies. The Avenger by Thomas De Quincey was published in 1838, The Heroic Slave by Frederick . . .

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