William Styron

William Styron

William Styron

William Styron

Excerpt

I have been reading and writing about William Styron for the past dozen years. I have tried to place his work in an international context and illuminate a sensibility with broad and far-ranging sympathies. The study which follows should suggest at least something of Styron's versatility and point up the fact that he is the least parochial of contemporary American writers.

The first three chapters appeared in earlier and somewhat different form as follows: the first four sections of chapter one as "William Styron: An Interim Appraisal," The English Journal, 50 (March 1961), pp. 149-158, 192; the fifth section of chapter one as "The Confessions of Nat Turner: The Convergence of 'Non‐ fiction Novel' and 'Meditation on History,' " Journal of Popular Culture, 1 (Fall 1967), pp. 166-175; chapter two as "William Styron et le Nouveau Roman," in Configuration critique de William Styron, eds. Melvin J. Friedman and August J. Nigro (Paris: Lettres Modernes, 1967), pp. 85-109—in revised English translation as "William Styron and the Nouveau Roman," in Modern American Fiction: Insights and Foreign Lights, eds. W. T. Zyla and W. M. Aycock. Proceedings of the Comparative Literature Symposium, vol. 5 (Lubbock: Texas Tech Press, 1972), pp. 121-137; and chapter three as "William Styron," in The Politics of Twentieth-Century Novelists, ed. George A. Panichas (New York: Hawthorn Books, 1971), pp. 335-350. This last is reprinted by permission of Hawthorn Books, Inc. from The Politics of Twentieth-Century Novelists, ed. by George A. Panichas, copyright © 1971 by The University of Maryland. All rights reserved. I wish to thank the National Council of Teachers of English, the . . .

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