Classical Echoes in Tennyson

Classical Echoes in Tennyson

Read FREE!

Classical Echoes in Tennyson

Classical Echoes in Tennyson

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Tennyson's constant study of the Greek and Roman classics is recorded in a great many passages of his son's Memoir, and abundant evidence to the same effect may be gleaned from his own poems. Twelve of these deal with distinctly classical subjects. The 'English Idyls' are professedly Theocritean in form; the 'Morte d'Arthur' is consciously and purposely Homeric. There are two translations from the Iliad, three experiments in quantity (after the classical manner), five poems in which he has borrowed or adapted certain of the metres of Catullus and Horace. And throughout the volume one often lights upon classical allusions and quotations, upon more or less conscious imitations, upon passages where a subtle or unconscious memory of some ancient poet seems to have determined the choice of a word or the turn of a phrase. " Having the sound of those auncient poetes still ringing in his eares, he mought needes, in singing, hit out some of theyr tunes. . . ."

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.