Home Front: The Government's War on Soldiers

Home Front: The Government's War on Soldiers

Home Front: The Government's War on Soldiers

Home Front: The Government's War on Soldiers

Synopsis

For every service member killed in Iraq, 15 others have fallen ill, and 4,500 have been returned to the U.S. for medical treatment. Why? In crisp, clear, compelling writing, a prize-winning journalist examines the health and medical issues-with detailed individual examples-facing American military personnel and veterans, and investigates the military/bureaucratic politicking behind them.

Excerpt

I was first approached by Clarity Press, Inc. to write a Foreword to Rick Anderson's remarkable book on the dismal treatment of American GIs by their own government because of my expertise related to American research and development of biochemical weapons of mass destruction and the shipment of same by the U.S. to the regime of Saddam Hussein in the 1980s—the very weapons which ostensibly occasioned the Bush administration's war on Iraq in 2003—as recounted in my lecture on “BioWarfare, Terror Weapons and the U.S.: Home Brew?”, published by Counterpunch.org on 25 April 2002. Previously, I had drafted the Biological Weapons Anti-terrorism Act of 1989, the U.S. domestic implementing legislation for the Biological Weapons Convention of 1972, that was passed unanimously by both Houses of the United States Congress and signed into law by President Bush Sr. In the fall of 1990, I served as Counsel for the successful defense of U.S. Marine Corps Lance Corporal Jeff Paterson, the first military resister as a matter of principle and conscience to Bush Sr.'s Gulf War I. Then I represented U.S. M.C. Lance Corporal David Mihaila in a successful effort to obtain his discharge from the Marine Corps during Bush Sr.'s Gulf War I as a Conscientious Objector. Corporal Mihaila was the Clerk of the Court for the Paterson court-martial proceeding and was motivated to apply for CO status as a result of my oral argument for Corporal Paterson.

Then at the start of 1991 I served as Counsel for the defense of Captain Dr. Yolanda Huet-Vaughn, who was court-martialed by the U.S. Army in part because of her refusal to administer experimental vaccines to soldiers destined to fight in the Bush Sr. Gulf War I. Later on, I served as Counsel for the defense of U.S. Army Captain Lawrence Rockwood, who was court-martialed for his heroic efforts to stop torture in Haiti after the United States government had invaded that country in 1994. So Clarity felt I had the practical experience and professional expertise required to comment upon the significance of what Rick Anderson had to say.

But as I read Home Front: The Government's War on Soldiers, I was deeply moved instead to approach the subject in a more personal manner relating to my own experience as the son of an American Marine who fought valiantly against the Japanese Imperial Army during the Second World War, because my father's life influenced not only my appreciation of the heroism and sacrifices of U.S. Marines, soldiers, sailors, airmen and now airwomen, but also my . . .

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