Terrorism & Development: Using Social and Economic Development to Inhibit a Resurgence of Terrorism

Terrorism & Development: Using Social and Economic Development to Inhibit a Resurgence of Terrorism

Terrorism & Development: Using Social and Economic Development to Inhibit a Resurgence of Terrorism

Terrorism & Development: Using Social and Economic Development to Inhibit a Resurgence of Terrorism

Synopsis

Examines the social and economic development policies enacted by Israel, the Philippines, and the United Kingdom to inhibit a resurgence of terrorism within their jurisdictions, with the aim of informing U.S. decisionmakers as they develop policy to counter terrorism.

Excerpt

This report examines social and economic development policies enacted by three countries—Israel, the Philippines, and the United Kingdom—to inhibit a resurgence of terrorist violence within their territorial jurisdictions. The analysis focuses on development initiatives that have been incorporated in wider peace and conflict resolution efforts in an attempt to mitigate local perceptions of past wrongdoings in communities that support terrorist groups. The research was designed to inform the U.S. governmental decisionmaking community of the benefits and possible pitfalls of emphasizing a specific social and economic dimension in strategies to counter the problem of terrorism.

In the months immediately following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States, RAND undertook several research projects related to counterterrorism and homeland security topics as elements of its continuing program of self-sponsored research. This report is the result of one of those research projects. The work was supported through the provisions for independent research and development in RAND's contracts for the operation of Department of Defense federally funded research and development centers: Project AIR FORCE (sponsored by the U.S. Air Force), the Arroyo Center (sponsored by the U.S. Army), and the National Defense Research Institute (sponsored by the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Staff, the unified commands, and the defense agencies). Dr. C. Richard Neu, Assistant to RAND's President for Research on Counterterrorism, provided overall supervision for this research. Comments on this study are welcomed and should be addressed either to the two authors or to Dr. Neu.

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