Days in Attica

Days in Attica

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Days in Attica

Days in Attica

Read FREE!

Excerpt

A century ago the tide of travel left Greece high and dry. Athens possessed but one tavern, and the few adventurers who came usually stayed with their consul or lodged with the French Capuchins in the monastery that then enclosed the Monument of Lysicrates. Now there are half a dozen first-class hotels, many smaller ones, and a few modest pensions. French fashions, English medicines, and German hardware are all seen in the main streets of the town.

Yet Greece is still a remote land. Tourists do not come here as readily as to Italy or Egypt; the Greek himself speaks of "going to Europe" and distinguishes between "European" and "native" goods. The Balkan highlands detach Greece from the rest of the continent, and to all intents and purposes she is an island. It is hoped that in a few years' time the railway which is already completed as far as Larisa will be continued to Salonika, where it will join the European system. For the present the three main routes to Athens are by Brindisi, by Marseilles, and by Constantinople. The most direct line with the shortest sea voyage

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