Nationalism and Sectionalism in South Carolina, 1852-1860: A Study of the Movement for Southern Independence

Nationalism and Sectionalism in South Carolina, 1852-1860: A Study of the Movement for Southern Independence

Nationalism and Sectionalism in South Carolina, 1852-1860: A Study of the Movement for Southern Independence

Nationalism and Sectionalism in South Carolina, 1852-1860: A Study of the Movement for Southern Independence

Excerpt

Every piece of historical writing is a co-operative work. The historian, even when his subject is quite limited in scope, is indebted to innumerable persons and institutions, as a mere glance at the bibliography and footnotes to this book will show. To a host of unnamed coadjutors and benefactors-- historians, biographers, editors, bibliographers, curators, librarians, copy-readers, statisticians, cartographers, genealogists, antiquarians, friends, neighbors, and relatives--I should like to express my gratitude for making this study possible. To those who have collected source materials for the history of South Carolina and the South, and to those who have written in these fields, I feel particularly indebted. Several university professors have given me invaluable information, suggestions, and criticism. Professors William T. Laprade and Charles S. Sydnor, who have done much to stimulate research in political and Southern history among graduate students at Duke University, have been most helpful.

The framework of the story told in this book is shaped more by a consideration for the factional alignments in South Carolina than for national issues. Each chapter is not simply a treatment of one of the leading issues, such as the Kansas-Nebraska Act, the slave trade, Cuba, or the John Brown raid. Instead, each chapter deals with a multitude of issues as they affected factional groupings in the state. The first chapter is both an introduction to the narrative and an exposition of political leadership in the decade of the fifties. The second chapter begins the narrative in the year 1852; and, in order to explain the situation in that year, the secession controversy of the previous two years is reviewed. Each of the following eight chapters is devoted to one year. These chapters contain accounts . . .

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