New Challenges for International Leadership: Lessons from Organizations with Global Missions

New Challenges for International Leadership: Lessons from Organizations with Global Missions

New Challenges for International Leadership: Lessons from Organizations with Global Missions

New Challenges for International Leadership: Lessons from Organizations with Global Missions

Synopsis

Recommends that U.S. organizations that have an international reach or that are involved in preparing individuals for careers that involve an internatinal component encourage the development of portfolioo careers; develop personnel practices to support portfolio careers, and international university curricula.

Excerpt

Is the United States producing the leaders it will need in the 21st century? The research reported here (New Challenges for International Leadership: Lessons from Organizations with Global Missions, MR-1670-IP) was undertaken to address this question. It was prompted by concerns about America's capacity to develop among its people the intellectual and professional expertise that will be required for leadership in the increasingly globalized environment of the 21st century.

RAND proposed to explore this issue by interviewing representatives of internationally oriented organizations, which confront these questions daily, as well as by querying experts who could provide insights into the answers to those questions (see Appendixes A and B). We also proposed to review recent literature on this topic. The results of that effort are available in a separate RAND report by Gustav Lindstrom, Tora K. Bikson, and Gregory F. Treverton (Developing America's Leaders for a Globalized Environment: Lessons from Literature Across Public and Private Sectors, MR-1627-IP, 2002). Themes emerging from these research activities are further explored in Issue Papers by Gregory F. Treverton and Tora K. Bikson (New Challenges for International Leadership: Positioning the United States for the 21st Century, IP-233-IP, 2002) and by Paul Light (Rebuilding The Supply Chain of Foreign Affairs Leaders, IP-244-IP, 2002).

The project was supported chiefly by a grant from the Starr Foundation, with supplemental funding from the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, the United Nations Foundation, and RAND. It was guided by an advisory council made up of the leaders of major foreign affairs institutions—the Council on Foreign Relations, American Enterprise Institute, American International Group, Inc., The Brookings Institution, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Center for . . .

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