World System History: The Social Science of Long-Term Change

World System History: The Social Science of Long-Term Change

World System History: The Social Science of Long-Term Change

World System History: The Social Science of Long-Term Change

Synopsis

This extraordinary book presents a refreshing and innovative overview of the changes to the global system over the last 5000 years. Featuring renowned contributors - each specialists in their field - this is the only volume to offer so co-ordinated a study of continuity and change in the global social, economic and political system. Key areas covered include: * International Political Economy - Robert A. Denemark * Archaeology - Jonathan Freidman * Economic development - Andre Gunder Frank * History - George Modelski * Sociology - Christopher Chase-Dunn

Excerpt

Toward a social science of long-term change

Robert A. Denemark, Jonathan Friedman, Barry K. Gills and George Modelski

This volume is designed as a fundamental starting point for the transdisciplinary study of continuity and change in the global social, economic, and political system over the longest of historical terms. Scholars from a variety of fields have long sought to acquire knowledge of this scope. Attempts to frame such a perspective face several significant challenges.

World history in its proper context

The first challenge is epistemological. What is it that can be known about such broad sweeps of the human experience? The work in this volume is predicated on the belief that there are real themes, continuities, perhaps even patterns that emerge over the long sweep of world history. These may be explicated, though this must be accomplished with careful attention to relevant context. Our goal is not to frame inviolate historical laws, but to explore continuities, consistent patterns, and recognizable behavioral repertoires, and understand their genesis and development over time.

The first section of this volume includes four major papers on the nature and dynamics of world system history by scholars from different disciplines and perspectives. Each deals in an explicit manner with a number of critical concepts and the processes that are linked to them. These include:

The world system

While in some sense fundamental to each of the perspectives in this volume, the term ‘world system’ continues to draw criticism, particularly for its lack of specificity What constitutes a world system? What are to be considered its legitimate parameters? By what processes is such a world system defined? Does world systemic logic undergo fundamental transformations? Is the world system always basically the same? Has there been a single (evolving) world system, have there been areas external to it, or have separate systems existed side by side? If the latter, how can different world systems be compared?

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.