History of the Labor Movement in the United States - Vol. 10

History of the Labor Movement in the United States - Vol. 10

History of the Labor Movement in the United States - Vol. 10

History of the Labor Movement in the United States - Vol. 10

Excerpt

This is the tenth volume of my History of the Labor Movement in the United States. It is also the second volume dealing with the Trade Union Educational League. The preceding volume covered the TUEL from its founding in 1920 to the end of the Gompers Era in 1924. The present volume carries the history of the Trade Union Educational League from 1924 to its end in 1929 and its replacement by the Trade Union Unity League, whose history we will deal with in the next volume.

In the previous volume I criticized most labor historians for virtually ignoring the activities of the Trade Union Educational League during the early years of its existence. Nearly all labor historians view the TUEL as virtually dead by 1925. But, as we shall see in the present volume, the Trade Union Educational League continued to hold aloft the banner of labor militancy, of industrial unionism, of labor solidarity, and other progressive issues in the years that followed the inauguration of William Green as the successor to Samuel Gompers as president of the American Federation of Labor. Moreover, this in a period that the standard interpretation sees as deprived of labor militancy, a period of lean years not only for organized labor, but also for the radical movement in general. The Trade Union Educational League waged some of the most militant labor struggles in American history. During a time of unabashed class collaboration by the established trade union leadership, the TUEL kept alive militant working class traditions and an active core of the Left in the labor movement.

As in the case of previous volumes of the History of the Labor Movement in the United States, in writing volume 10 I have received help from many institutions and people. I am again grateful for the cooperation of libraries, librarians, and archivists. I particularly thank Dorothy Swanson of the Tamiment Institute Library of New York University who has been so helpful in this and previous volumes. I wish also to thank the University of Pennsylvania Library, especially its splendid interlibrary loan department, the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, the Library of Congress, New York Public Library, the Chicago Historical Society, YIVO Institute for Jewish Study Archives, New York City, the libraries of the University of Wisconsin, Indiana University, Princeton University, Columbia University, Temple University, Harvard University, Rutgers University, University of California (Los Angeles), University of California (Berkeley), State University of New York at Binghamton, Syracuse University . . .

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