ICT, Pedagogy, and the Curriculum: Subject to Change

ICT, Pedagogy, and the Curriculum: Subject to Change

ICT, Pedagogy, and the Curriculum: Subject to Change

ICT, Pedagogy, and the Curriculum: Subject to Change

Synopsis

This book explores the impact new information and communication technologies are having on teaching and the way children learn. The book addresses key issues across all phases of primary and secondary education, both in the UK and internationally. ICT, Pedagogy and the Curriculum looks at the relationship between ICT, paradigms of teaching and learning, and the way in which curriculum subjects are represented. Three principal areas are addressed: * the wider perception of ICT in society, culture and schooling * the challenges to pedagogy * the way in which ICT not only supports learning and teaching but changes the nature of curriculum subjects. The tensions between the use of technology to replicate traditional practices, and the possibilities for transforming the curriculum and pedagogy are explored, offering an original and distinctively critical perspective on the way in which we understand ICT in education. It will be of interest to all primary and secondary teachers and those in initial teacher training who are concerned about current technology initiatives in education and how to respond to them.

Excerpt

At the end of reading this provocative book one might happily pass a relaxed coffee break or two, in staffroom or senior commonroom, seeking to clarify a vision of the future. Technology in particular encourages us to do this, most probably because the speed of change means that anticipation is more than an idle conceit: it is a survival tactic. The contents of this book suggest that it may be a survival tactic for education too and an urgent task.

Depressingly, in education anticipating emerging trends has also been historically important so that we can confiscate the manifestations of those trends at the school door before they threaten to precipitate change: ballpoint pens, transistor radios, calculators, computer games, mobile phones …can you imagine the chaos that might have resulted if an entire generation was allowed to adopt ballpoint pens willy-nilly? Probably not, but many readers of this book, for some spurious reason or another, will have been banned from the classroom for using such pens. Education, rightly conservative with children’s lives, is downright paranoid about technology, seeking to confiscate, assimilate or smother it before any damage can be done! It is clear, however, that, this time, the changes brought by the current wave of technology cannot be confiscated at the school gate, are embedded in our social and economic lives and will precipitate change in our learning institutions.

It does not help that our anticipation of the future has so often been wide of the mark—either the vector or speed of change are misjudged: my venerable 1959 schoolboy’s copy of The Story of Man concludes with a final chapter ‘What of tomorrow?’ in which it is anticipated that by around the year 2000 ‘rockets will be rushing about space’ (so far so good), ‘atomic and solar energy will enable us to employ yet more machinery’ (you can see where this is leading), so that ‘we shall work less and thus have more time both to amuse and improve ourselves’ (we wish) and concludes that ‘today there are still places where people go hungry and are insufficiently clothed, but the day will come when there will be enough of the good things of life for everyone’—a vision which clearly erred on

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