Delivering the Vision: Public Services for the Information Society and the Knowledge Economy

Delivering the Vision: Public Services for the Information Society and the Knowledge Economy

Delivering the Vision: Public Services for the Information Society and the Knowledge Economy

Delivering the Vision: Public Services for the Information Society and the Knowledge Economy

Synopsis

Delivering the Vision explores the way in which public service visions have developed globally and how successful they have been in contributing to major social and economic change.

Excerpt

Mathematical purists heralded the commencement of the twenty-first century as being the dawn of the year 2001, if this were so, then in terms of the information society at least, it was a dawn clouded by the complexities and anxieties arising from the presidential election ‘outcome’ in the United States. The world’s last global superpower found itself the subject of internal wrangling both political and legal, and external incredulity that the democratic process could have unravelled to such an extent that chaos did indeed reign for a period of several weeks. The cause of all of this uncertainty was the perceived and actual unreliability of electoral data and the apparent lack of robustness in the methods for collecting and analysing it. As a case study in modern democracy it is, perhaps, a salutary reminder that the rhetoric surrounding the role of information in society can be thrown into somewhat stark relief by the realities of actual practice.

Consider too the term knowledge economy. It too is a phrase familiar to politicians, although what precisely they mean by it, beyond an aspiration to create greater employment in technology-based industries, is, more often than not, poorly articulated. However, if we take accepted definitions of knowledge as being something tacit, not normally articulated in a readily collectable form, but possessing some intrinsic value when extracted and analysed, then once more we can see the capacity for governments to be less than successful in this area of activity. So, for example, in April 2001 the United Kingdom undertook its census of the population, the first since 1991, and much heralded in respect of the advances anticipated from increased use of information and communications technologies. However, early analysis of the exercise, as reported widely in UK media, indicates that rather than improving the quantity and speed of information gathering and processing, providing key knowledge assets to feed into planning and policy formation processes, that the levels of citizen input achieved have been less than those achieved over 100 years ago. Instead of maximising the potential for extracting valuable knowledge assets, the process has, instead, proved to be successful in the key negative indicator areas of chaos creation and the engendering of public antipathy towards the process.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.