The Future of Genetically Modified Crops: Lessons from the Green Revolution

The Future of Genetically Modified Crops: Lessons from the Green Revolution

The Future of Genetically Modified Crops: Lessons from the Green Revolution

The Future of Genetically Modified Crops: Lessons from the Green Revolution

Synopsis

Investigates the circumstances and processes required to establish the new Ogene Revolutiono in which genetically modified crops are tailored to address chronic agricultural problems in specific regions of the world.

Excerpt

The number of people in danger of malnutrition worldwide has decreased significantly in the past 30 years, thanks in part to the Green Revolution of the 20th century. However, an estimated 800 million people still lack adequate access to food. the world now sits at the cusp of a second potential agricultural revolution, the “Gene Revolution” in which modern biotechnology enables the production of genetically modified (GM) crops that may be tailored to address ongoing agricultural problems in specific regions of the world. the gm crop movement has the potential to do enormous good, but also presents novel risks and has significant challenges to overcome before it can truly be considered revolutionary. This monograph seeks to answer these questions: Can the Gene Revolution become in fact a global revolution, and, if so, how should it best proceed?

This report draws on lessons from the Green Revolution to inform stakeholders who are concerned with the current gm crop movement. We hope that this analysis can illuminate opportunities for gm crops to increase farm production, rural income, and food security in developing countries, while controlling potential risks to health and the environment. the analysis and findings in this report are intended for all individuals and institutions interested in improving agricultural production and food quality in the developing world, and particularly those who have a stake in the worldwide debate over genetically modified crops.

This report results from the rand Corporation's continuing program of self-sponsored independent research. Support for such . . .

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